BOJ Survey Shows Business Confidence Higher

Japanese companies’ concerns about the domestic economy remaining stagnant — which were prevalent until mid-2016 — appear to be fading, according to the latest Bank of Japan (BOJ) March 2017 Tankan survey. This change in sentiment seems to have stemmed from factors such as the recovery in the global economy as well as a depreciation of the yen.



However, at the same time, the survey also found that Japanese businesses are not overly optimistic about the future — owing to factors including uncertainties surrounding the Trump administration’s policy management, as well as a labor shortage in Japan.

With regard to the situation in the U.S., there have been some benefits to Japanese exporters since Donald Trump won the presidential election in November 2016 — owing to the yen’s depreciation. However, looking ahead, Japanese businesses are aware that the U.S. may impose protectionist trade barriers against its trading partners.

Furthermore, there are also concerns about the political situation in Europe — specifically on issues such as the forthcoming French presidential election. The above factors explain why on the one hand, companies sense an element of recovery, but on the other, they are cautious about the future. This has been reflected by the worsening in the diffusion index among respondents’ in this latest Tankan survey.

via Mainichi

This article is for general information purposes only. It is not investment advice or a solution to buy or sell securities. Opinions are the authors; not necessarily that of OANDA Corporation or any of its affiliates, subsidiaries, officers or directors. Leveraged trading is high risk and not suitable for all. You could lose all of your deposited funds.

Alfonso Esparza

Alfonso Esparza

Senior Currency Analyst at Market Pulse
Alfonso Esparza specializes in macro forex strategies for North American and major currency pairs. Upon joining OANDA in 2007, Alfonso Esparza established the MarketPulseFX blog and he has since written extensively about central banks and global economic and political trends. Alfonso has also worked as a professional currency trader focused on North America and emerging markets. He has been published by The MarketWatch, Reuters, the Wall Street Journal and The Globe and Mail, and he also appears regularly as a guest commentator on networks including Bloomberg and BNN. He holds a finance degree from the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM) and an MBA with a specialization on financial engineering and marketing from the University of Toronto.
Alfonso Esparza