Markets Deserting Commodities

Investors are betting that the worst isn’t over for commodity prices that already are the lowest in five years.

About $907 million was pulled from U.S. exchange-traded products backed by raw materials this month, the most since April, data compiled by Bloomberg show. Expanding surpluses, a surging dollar and slowing growth in China helped send the Bloomberg Commodity Index to the lowest since 2009, reversing first-half gains fueled by a polar vortex and dead pigs in the U.S., and escalating tensions in Ukraine and the Middle East.

Banks from Societe Generale SA to Citigroup Inc. expect the losses for many raw material to continue. U.S. farmers are collecting the biggest corn and soybean crops ever, and global stockpiles of nickel are at an all-time high. Americans are producing the most oil since 1986, compounding a global surplus. China, the largest consumer of grains, energy and metals, is poised for its slowest expansion in two decades.

Bloomberg

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