US Homebuilder Confidence Remains High in February

Tax cuts are still making homebuilders feel better, even as mortgage rates rise to the highest level in more than four years.

Builder confidence was unchanged in February from the prior month, remaining at 72 on the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index (HMI). Anything above 50 is considered positive sentiment.

The index is up from 65 in February 2017 and hit a cyclical high of 74 last December, just as the Republican tax cut plan was being passed.

“Builders are excited about the pro-business political climate that will strengthen the housing market and support overall economic growth,” said NAHB chairman Randy Noel, a custom home builder from LaPlace, LA.



“However, they need to manage supply-side construction hurdles, such as shortages of labor and lots and building material price increases,” he added.

Future sales expectations appear to be driving builder confidence. That component of the index rose to a post-recession high of 80, while the index measuring buyer traffic held steady at 54. Current sales conditions, however, fell one point to 78.

“With ongoing job creation, increasing owner-occupied household formation, and a tight supply of existing home inventory, the single-family housing sector should continue to strengthen at a gradual but consistent pace,” said NAHB chief cconomist Robert Dietz.

via CNBC

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Alfonso Esparza

Alfonso Esparza

Senior Currency Analyst at Market Pulse
Alfonso Esparza specializes in macro forex strategies for North American and major currency pairs. Upon joining OANDA in 2007, Alfonso Esparza established the MarketPulseFX blog and he has since written extensively about central banks and global economic and political trends. Alfonso has also worked as a professional currency trader focused on North America and emerging markets. He has been published by The MarketWatch, Reuters, the Wall Street Journal and The Globe and Mail, and he also appears regularly as a guest commentator on networks including Bloomberg and BNN. He holds a finance degree from the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM) and an MBA with a specialization on financial engineering and marketing from the University of Toronto.
Alfonso Esparza