Investors Looking for Higher Yields Boosting Emerging Markets

The hunt for yield is driving investors back into emerging markets – but there are a few key differences this time round.

Emerging market equities, measured by the MSCI Emerging Markets Index, are now 30 percent up from the low seen at the end of January, and have rallied by 13 percent since the post-Brexit referendum sell-off.

Plus, in the past five weeks, record amounts of money have been invested in emerging market debt, according to figures from Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

These assets are traditionally perceived as riskier bets than more established markets. Still, with a low to negative interest rate environment across the Western world, and plenty of liquidity in the market, investors are looking outside safe havens.

However, there are still plenty of nasty surprises which could spark another sell-off such as an earlier-than-forecast hike in interest rates the U.S. Federal Reserve or a bonds market rout in the established markets.
“We see scope for the markets to run further still over the near-term,” strategists at UBS wrote in a research note. However, there is plenty of differentiation within the asset class – and the big four of Brazil, Russia, India and China aren’t always the center of attention.

In spite of this revival of interest in emerging markets, the popularity of Chinese assets seems to have declined as concerns about the health of the world’s second largest economy continue. Investors reduced their positions in Chinese assets by more than in any other emerging markets economy in June, according to EPFR Global. Around $25 billion of capital per month is being taken out of China, according to Capital Economics research.

via CNBC

Alfonso Esparza

Alfonso Esparza

Senior Currency Analyst at Market Pulse
Alfonso Esparza specializes in macro forex strategies for North American and major currency pairs. Upon joining OANDA in 2007, he established the MarketPulseFX blog and he has since written extensively about central banks and global economic and political trends. Alfonso has also worked as a professional currency trader focused on North America and emerging markets. He holds a finance degree from the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM) and an MBA with a specialization on financial engineering and marketing from the University of Toronto.
Alfonso Esparza