U.K. Factories Start 2016 on Weak Footing as Export Orders Fall

Manufacturers aren’t having a great start to the year.

Export orders fell at a sharper pace in January compared with December and total orders at factories also declined, the Confederation of British Industry said in a survey published in London on Monday. An index of optimism, measured on a quarterly basis, rose slightly, but remained below zero.

The industry has been in the doldrums for years as weakness in the euro area and the strength of sterling weighs on exports, and the CBI report adds to evidence that improvements aren’t on the horizon. Industrial production plunged the most in almost three years in November, according to official data from the statistics office.

“Uncertainty around the prospects for global growth, uncompetitive energy costs and the strength of the pound have all played their part in U.K. manufacturers finding conditions tough when trying to sell overseas,” said Rain Newton-Smith, CBI director of economics.

The CBI survey showed that while domestic demand remains strong, global turmoil is creeping further into growth prospects. Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne said that the U.K. faces a “dangerous cocktail” of risks stemming from China’s cooling economy and the drop in oil prices.

Bloomberg

Craig Erlam
Based in London, England, Craig Erlam joined OANDA in 2015 as a Market Analyst. With more than five years' experience as a financial market analyst and trader, he focuses on both fundamental and technical analysis while conducting macroeconomic commentary. He has been published by The Financial Times, Reuters, the BBC and The Telegraph, and he also appears regularly as a guest commentator on Bloomberg TV, CNBC, FOX Business and BNN. Craig holds a full membership to the Society of Technical Analysts and he is recognized as a Certified Financial Technician by the International Federation of Technical Analysts.