China’s Top Planner Says Economy Added 13M Jobs in 2015, Economy Grew About 7%

China economy likely grew by around 7 percent in 2015 and added 13 million new jobs, the top economic planning agency said on Tuesday as it announced the approval of more large infrastructure projects to avert the risks of a sharper slowdown.

China achieved its main economic targets in 2015, Li Pumin, spokesman for the National Reform and Development Commission (NDRC) told a news conference on Tuesday, a week before official fourth-quarter and full-year 2015 figures will be released.

Li’s comments come as a renewed plunge in Chinese stock markets and a sharp slide in the yuan currency have stoked concerns among global investors about the health of the world’s second-largest economy, though there is little evidence that conditions in China have deteriorated dramatically in recent weeks.

Still, growth of 7 percent would be the slowest in a quarter of a century, and down from 7.3 percent in 2014 as weak demand at home and abroad, industrial overcapacity and faltering investment weigh on the world’s second-largest economy.

CNBC

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Craig Erlam
Based in London, England, Craig Erlam joined OANDA in 2015 as a Market Analyst. With more than five years' experience as a financial market analyst and trader, he focuses on both fundamental and technical analysis while conducting macroeconomic commentary. He has been published by The Financial Times, Reuters, the BBC and The Telegraph, and he also appears regularly as a guest commentator on Bloomberg TV, CNBC, FOX Business and BNN. Craig holds a full membership to the Society of Technical Analysts and he is recognized as a Certified Financial Technician by the International Federation of Technical Analysts.