China Lead Investment Bank Continues to Grow Membership

Just a few months ago, Beijing’s plan to build a rival to the World Bank looked like something of a quixotic mission.

With the initial deadline to join the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) fast approaching, only a few countries had pledged their support. The United States, and its close allies, remained on the sidelines.

Then earlier this month, the U.K. broke ranks, announcing it would apply for membership in the hope of becoming the first major Western economy to join the China-led financial institution.

That opened the floodgates. France, Germany and Italy all said they would follow Britain’s lead. So did Switzerland and Austria. South Korea, one of the U.S.’s most trusted allies in Asia, also applied for membership of the AIIB, which will help finance projects in the region.

China set about building its own development bank because it was frustrated by a relative lack of influence at the World Bank (a U.S.-based institution) and the Asian Development Bank (where Japan is a major force).

Skeptical about how the bank would be run, and seeking to limit its effectiveness, the U.S. quietly encouraged allies not to participate.

via CNN

Alfonso Esparza

Alfonso Esparza

Senior Currency Analyst at Market Pulse
Alfonso Esparza specializes in macro forex strategies for North American and major currency pairs. Upon joining OANDA in 2007, Alfonso Esparza established the MarketPulseFX blog and he has since written extensively about central banks and global economic and political trends. Alfonso has also worked as a professional currency trader focused on North America and emerging markets. He holds a finance degree from the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM) and an MBA with a specialization on financial engineering and marketing from the University of Toronto.
Alfonso Esparza