China Concern Sees Iron Ore Slump Most since August 2009

Iron ore extended its decline into a bear market, slumping by the most since August 2009, amid concern that demand in China is slowing just as rising output signals a global glut.

Ore with 62 percent content delivered to Tianjin fell 8.3 percent to $104.70 a dry ton, the lowest since October 2012 and the biggest drop in more than four years, according to data from The Steel Index Ltd. yesterday. The benchmark price lost 27 percent since Aug. 14, when it reached a five-month high of $142.80. The raw material dropped into a bear market on March 7.

BHP Billiton Ltd. (BHP) and Rio Tinto Group predict lower prices this year after producers in Australia and Brazil spent billions of dollars to expand output. Banks from Citigroup Inc. to UBS AG predict a global surplus, and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. listed iron ore among its least-preferred commodities for 2014. A surge in stockpiles at China’s ports spurred speculation that the inventory overhang threatens imports.

Bloomberg

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